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Hardy2
November 15, 2006

School Days


Montauk School

Mr. Brunn, the sixth grade science teacher, has been using his subject, science, to help teach another of his subjects, Language Arts. Appositives with a scientific orientation are on his students' minds. Check out this website, a free resource, for great materials: chompchomp.com/terms/appositive.htm Can you pick out the appositives used in this sentence?

The sixth graders also had a chance to not only design a dream house, but they also had to price out the items they purchased for their home. Talk about an eye-opener! Check the display table near Mr. Larsen's room.

The second grade students visited the Shinnecock Cultural Center and then each chose one of the displays to write about. Using their Writing Workshop guidelines, Ms. Havlik's and Ms. Walker's students provide brief descriptions of the center to share with the rest of us. Take a look in their rooms to see the guidelines.

Ms. Moloney and Ms. Cusimano discussed the elections with their fourth grade students and provided brief descriptions of the platforms of each party. Maybe the future looks a little brighter: the Green Party candidates won almost every race!

A few weeks ago you may have noticed lots of Mr. Salzman's seventh graders with shiny faces. That was because they made molds of their faces for the plaster used to make the masks and they used petroleum jelly to protect their skin.

How many different ways did the seventh and eighth grade students report on the extra reading they did for Ms. Jahoda and Ms. Pfister? The student work is on display in both classrooms; the student must read 20 books independently throughout the year to satisfy their teachers' (and New York State's)requirements.

Springs School

The Junior High Elections have recently started under the direction of Margaret Garsetti, faculty coordinator. Any students who wanted to run had to get three academic (English, Spanish, Social Studies, Science, or Math) teachers and one special (Library, Gym, Music, Art) teacher to recommend them. Also, the participants and their parents had to ensure that they would participate in the bake sales, car washes and other fundraisers and events. Students in 7th grade can run for Vice President and Secretary, and students in 8th grade may run for President and Treasurer.

On November 8, candidates were allowed to put up campaign posters. Candidates for the office of Vice President are: Courtney Bennett, Amelia Whelan, and Andrew Rodriguez; Secretary: Julia Latham, Brittney Schmitt, Daniela Lupercio and Jamie Munoz; President: Jack Hodgens, Maria Grande, Ever Perez, Robert Rivera and Kady Field; Treasurer: Molly Harry. On Tuesday, the students gave their speeches.

In Christine Cleary's 5th grade class the students are learning about economics. They pretended the Black Smith shop was being sold and was going to be turned into a new place for people to come and enjoy. They turned it into a children's dance club. Dissent amongst the class ensued, when it was thought to conflict with the schools dances. Then they decided to turn it into a Chuck E. Cheese for the children that live around here. Two students decided that was also a bad idea.

Students are busily writing articles for the upcoming meeting with Newsday Editor Mary Beth Foley. Working with teacher Sue Ellen O'Connor, about 25 students have determined what the special programs in school are and will write articles for a future issue of Kidsday. Three students, Gabby Green, Lucy Villeneuve and Heather Wittmer also traveled to Carle Place (thanks to Mrs. Green), to interview actor/author John O'Hurley for the section.

Kindergarten through fifth grade classes honored the community's Veterans last Thursday at Spirit Meet. They watched a PowerPoint presentation by speech therapist Pat Philipbar that was moving and respectful. The students sang songs from the Spirit Meet program and saluted the Veterans and their families grade by grade under the attention of Joan Branche, kindergarten teacher.

Wainscott School

The students visited the Shinnecock Museum recently, where they learned about the history of the tribe and its customs. They made their beaded necklaces and watched a video that gave details about Native American life. The students also started swimming lessons at the Y this week; they will be taking lessons for six weeks.

The students will be preparing for the school's annual Thanksgiving feast tomorrow. They will prepare the desserts, set the tables and give presentations for the families in attendance.

The first grade science class has been very busy learning and raising brine shrimp. The third grade science class created herb butter mixtures as an edible demonstration of the interactions of matter, part of their course work about chemical elements.

Ross School

Farmer Jay visited the Pre-Nursery classroom and brought a rabbit, chicken, pig, duck and Guinea Pig so the children could feel, touch and learn about the animals firsthand. They also had the opportunity to ride a pony and are learning the Spanish names for each animal. The children planted daffodil bulbs in the garden and were visited by their Kindergarten buddies.

The Pre-K class presented a play, The New York Rocket Express, to an audience of appreciative students, parents and friends. The students made a dramatic entrance following the tracks through the audience wearing cardboard boxcars decorated with pictures of freight and singing. Onstage, the players delivered the snappy poem and then one by one each child stepped into the spotlight and delivered an original line. The children were poised and articulate. The audience was spellbound. Following a Question and Answer period the parents were invited to a cast party in the classroom where everyone celebrated the learning that took place during Pre-K's six weeks study of trains.

Kindergarteners have been studying the moon and its phases, including the full moon, the quarter moon, the half moon and the Gibbous moon; and they learned that the Native Americans had names for all of the full moons for each month. November is the Beaver Moon. It was the time to set the beaver traps before the swamps froze, so that the Native Americans would have a supply of warm winter furs.

Second-graders studied the five senses, and this has been integrated into several domains. We used the senses to help us add detail to our writing and learned about Helen Keller in shared reading. Children conducted exciting experiments in science, wrote their names in Braille on the computer, and made texture blocks in art! We discussed how the five senses work together as a system and the outcome if they do not.

Fifth graders have been dancing up a storm. At the Middle School Benefit Dance for Brain Tumor Research held November 3, they won the class dancing prize. In class, they have begun their second unit focusing on the study of ancient Sumer. In cultural history and English, they are using ancient literature and artifacts to learn about what life was like for the ancients.

Seventh grade science classes began a unit on classification with each student gathering and displaying a personal collection of local plant or animal-related specimens. Each specimen in the collection included its common and scientific names plus a discussion of its place in our environment. The unit will continue with learning experiences covering historical and modern methods of classification.

The eighth grade hosted an Islamic Banquet on November 8. Each student arrived at school dressed as a character from the golden age of Islam whom they have completed an extensive research project on.

The tenth grade has been exploring the issue of racism as it relates to today's society and the past. They took part in a variety of tests and activities to test hidden biases and to understand racism and how it affects each member of our society. They explored affirmative action and majority privilege and attempted to debate these concepts.

The Ross School fall theatre production titled, Scenes on a Theme of Life (and Death?) was presented in the Court Theatre in the Ross School Center for Well-Being from November 9-11. Middle and high school students presented an eclectic collection of offbeat and intriguing scenes and short, self-contained plays ranging from the hilarious to the poignant and dealing with aspects of life that we all encounter, as well as some that we hope not to! Two of the plays dealt speculatively with the life beyond.

Sag Harbor Elementary School

Last week, as part of our theme, Good Morning America, the next region of our country was introduced: the New England states. Jan Cosgrove's third grade class did a presentation about perseverance and the history behind Thanksgiving.

On Monday first grade teacher Brie Landry and teaching assistant Meredith McArdle made a presentation at Morning Program about Paul Revere and how he demonstrated perseverance.

Our annual holiday food drive started this week with an exciting presentation at Morning Program. Guidance counselor Michelle Grant and Kindergarten teacher Nina Landi introduced the "Food Pyramid Olympians" to the students and encouraged all to donate non-perishable items from the major food groups so that healthy holiday meals can be distributed to local families in need.

The Sag Harbor Parenting Center is sponsoring "Growing Pains," a workshop helping teens develop character and positive decision-making skills. This is a rare opportunity for parents and teens to attend a workshop together to address issues that adolescents are experiencing today. Special Guest Paul Failla will be speaking in the Pierson Auditorium on Tuesday, November 28 at 7 p.m. This evening is designed for parents of students in grades 5-12. Students in grades 8-12 are also invited to spend this evening with their parents as Mr. Failla talks about the connections between "right thinking" and "right choices."

Parent Teacher Conferences will take place next Monday and Tuesday. Dismissal from the elementary school will be at 11:15 a.m. School will be closed for the Thanksgiving Vacation from Next Wednesday through November 24.

The PTA is sponsoring Bingo Night on Friday at 6:30 p.m. There will be a bake sale as well.

Bridgehampton School

Bridgehampton students have been working hard to prepare for The Young Playwrights Festival scheduled for December 8 and 9 at the Bay Street Theatre in Sag Harbor.

Since the beginning of the school year, students have been working with Bay Street Theatre teaching artists Naimy Hackett and Kate Meuth. Students have been completing the writing phase of the collaboration. Each student will present a one-act play and one play per school will be selected for the public performance in December. Bridgehampton students will act in the play, assistant direct and assist with all aspects of production. Several schools on the East End are participating. This program helps promote self-expression, creativity, confidence and self-esteem.

Congratulations to Bridgehampton senior Chane Lamb. She has been nominated to receive recognition by the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) for her community service and overall character. She will be awarded on November 14.

Student Council elections will be held on Friday. As soon as representatives are selected, the school will be sponsoring a Thanksgiving Food Drive and a Holiday Toy Drive.

Southampton High School

The Studio Art classes at Southampton High School are working on a project based on Roy Lichtenstein's "American Indian Encounters," an exhibit currently on display at the Parrish Art Museum. Dorothy Lichtenstein generously donated many beautiful books and exhibit catalogs to the classes to bring added inspiration to the project.

On Friday, Southampton High School will host its 17th Annual International Feast sponsored by the High School Multicultural Club and organized by Thelma Lee. Staff, students and parents are all asked to bring in a dish that represents their ethnic backgrounds. The students and staff are then invited to have lunch for a small donation.

Southampton Intermediate School

Throughout the week of November 13, in preparation for Thanksgiving, the eighth grade Home and Careers students prepared spice bread for their family, friends, teachers and support staff as a way of saying thank you.

Members of the Southampton Intermediate National Junior Honor Society (NJHS) would like to thank everyone who donated their used eyeglasses to "Sight Night." More than 180 glasses were donated. NJHS has begun collecting gently used coats for their annual coat drive. All coats will be donated to Southampton Human Resources and can be brought to the main lobby of Southampton Intermediate School.

Southampton Elementary School

On November 6, the Southampton Elementary School announced the winners of the PTA-sponsored Reflections Program at a special ceremony. Nine students' pieces in the areas of Visual Arts, Photography, and Literature were chosen to move on to the state level. Congratulations to the following students whose work will be moving on to state: Visual Arts: Lorenz Lopez, Luca Savarese and Hillary Wittenberg; Photography: Thomas Malone, Ian Saw-Burke and Christopher Osufsen; and Literature: Ana Martin, Sarah Elizabeth Pierson and Katherine Zaneski.

The following students received Honorable Mentions: Emma Armus (Visual Arts), Jacob Armus (Literature), Gavin Beyer (Visual Arts), Kivlan King (Visual Arts), Miranda Maloney (Literature), Jessica McKnight (Photography), Mathew Morgani (Photography), Shelby Pierson (Literature), and Nicholas White (Literature).

For more than 30 years, the second grade classes at Southampton Elementary School have enjoyed a traditional Thanksgiving Feast specially prepared by their families. This year, the feast will occur next Tuesday in the school gymnasium. In addition to an appetizing meal, the students will treat their guests to seasonal poems and songs.

Students are currently collecting new toys and coats for those in need this holiday season. All donations should be placed in the designated bins in front of the gym. If you have any questions, you may contact Gwendolen Arnzen at 591-4805 or Doug Grable at 591-4807.

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