Hardy Plumbing
November 15, 2006

Shelter Stories



/editorial/2006-11-15/64466.1.med.jpg
shadow
King (click for larger version)

/editorial/2006-11-15/64466.2.med.jpg
shadow
Spades (click for larger version)
Senior Dogs

Getting older isn't fun, particularly if you're a dog who's spent your life in what you thought was "your home and loving family." Suddenly, you're out. You find yourself in a cement run, usually unheated, with scores of barking strangers around you and no familiar human faces. How did this happen?

The dog doesn't know or understand and usually falls into a deep depression. What went wrong? Nothing. Too many people regard senior dogs as disposable items and decide to adopt puppies. My senior terrier mix — now 20, if you can imagine it — Mr. Ben, went through this and just gave up. He stayed in the back of his kennel cage and was deemed unadoptable. I took him only hours before he was going to be euthanized. He became a companion dog for my mother in 1992 — she had a serious stroke — and has lived a long and happy life.

The plight of senior dogs can't be brought home enough. RSVP has two great ones — Spades, a female Lab mix with a great face. She's housebroken, healthy, loves to play ball and loves children. She's very well trained. What's she doing without a home? Alone. Spending long, lonely days in the Riverhead Animal Shelter. Please call RSVP about this wonderful dog. (631) 728-3524. Spades is seven or eight with many good years ahead of her, if the right person comes along.

Then there's Summer. She's a seven-year-old, tri-colored female Shepherd mix and weighs 40 pounds. She's more like my Mr. Ben — not doing well without a real home. Spades is trying her best to make a go of it but abandonment for a dog is horrible. They live to please us. Please get in touch with RSVP and see these dogs.

Seniors Snooper and Pooh, who had been abused, have wonderful new homes. You remember them. Pooh has gained weight and has gotten over his depression. Seniors are so grateful to be wanted again. You won't regret giving one a home. And they're trained and know the ropes — making it easy for you.

Update: Holly, the beautiful cat from last week, was adopted. But Kisses, the dog who lived her life on a short chain in a junkyard, is still with Dr. Archer at the Riverhead Animal Hospital. She's a young dog, Boxer with a touch of Pit, and was named Kisses by the police and Humane Society that saved her life. Contact RSVP about her. They're screening applicants carefully. Poor Kisses never had a chance in life. The adoption has to be a good one. And think senior. You'll never regret it. I didn't with my Mr. Ben.

Site Search


Lang
2107 Capeletti Front Tile
Gurney's Inn