image
Gurney's Inn
media
bulletNight Moves
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
bulletNight Moves
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer
spacer
image
spacer spacer

January 16, 2013

Deep Detox: The Ayurvedic Cleanse



hfslideshow2
shadow
(click for larger version)
Every single moment, the body cleanses itself, Jolie Parcher of Mandala Yoga in Amagansett explained. Ayurveda suggests periodic internal cleanses to boost the natural action, burn fat and toxins and prevent disorders from taking root.

Last Thursday, Parcher described the cleanse she's offering this week, in collaboration with the folks at Simply Sublime Health Food Market and Café.

There are two cleanse options, one more intensive than the other.

The gentle cleanse involves following a mono-diet, eating only kichari for eight days. Kichari is an easy-to-digest mixture combining mung beans and a grain. (Check out our video demo of Sublime's Alison Burke showing how to make kichari.) The mono-diet is described as deeply grounding to the digestive system and rejuvenating to digestion.

The more intensive version of the cleanse brings a concoction comprised of ghee, rice milk, honey and water to each morning. Ghee is clarified butter and while the idea of drinking a butter drink sounds nasty to some, those who've tried it say the drink tastes like whipped cream.

Participants would start their eight days by adding just two tablespoons of ghee to the rice milk and, as the cleanse progresses, increasing the amount to a limit of 14 tablespoons. Kichari again, is a mainstay of the intensive cleanse, but nonfat foods like oatmeal, plain vegetables and fruit may be added.

The last day of the intensive cleanse involves undergoing a castor oil purge, followed by a sesame oil "basti" to lubricate the colon after cleansing.

The basti involves a topical application of sesame oil into the colon in a method similar to an enema. But with a basti, the focus is on adding a lubricant rather than coaxing waste removal.

Parcher acknowledged the cleanses are both difficult to undergo "in the midst of life." There can be a period of emotional withdrawal from food, as participants let go of sugar and chemicals.

The ghee helps lubricate the body internally, to aid digestion. Parcher also offers body treatments that add additional lubrication from the exterior.

The ancient treatments are designed to pull toxins from deep layers into the digestive tract to be easily eliminated. Parcher recommends at least one or two of the body treatments for those doing the intensive cleanse.

The cleanse is not suggested for people who consume a lot of coffee or sugar. Better to first detox from those substances before undergoing the cleanse, Parcher said.

It's also suggested that while you're undergoing a cleanse, you refrain from intense physical exertion. Does cooking kichari seem like exercise to you? Simply Sublime offers the cleanse meals for the full eight days. Or, Burke said, "You can just drop by and grab a cleanse meal when it's convenient."

Visit www.simplysublimewellness.com or www.mandalayoga.com to learn more.

kmerrill@indyeastend.com

Reader Feedback Submission
Use this form to submit Reader Feedback.
* required value
Your Name*

Subject

Comment*

Verification*


Site Search



Scan
media