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September 12, 2012


Deeper In Debt

Dear Editor,

Another week, another disappointing jobs report. And, predictably, still no plan put forward by incumbent Congressman Tim Bishop to fix this economic mess.

Congressman Bishop likes to blame other people for the economic woes facing Long Island. In Tim Bishop's world, he's never accountable. He never takes responsibility. It's always some else's fault.

Well, the fact of the matter is that Tim Bishop deserves his share of the blame for our dismal economy and soaring unemployment here on Long Island.

According to the United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are 45,272 more people unemployed on Long Island today than there were the day that Tim Bishop was sworn into Congress nearly a decade ago.

Long Island's unemployment rate has risen from 5.2 percent all the way up to 8 percent. That's a 54 percent increase!

Congressman Bishop's repeated votes for trillions in higher taxes, more spending and irresponsible debt have helped to cripple Long Island's economy and put our nation more than $16 trillion in debt.

His rabid support for President Obama's big government takeover of healthcare has only made it worse for small businesses too afraid to hire new workers.

The $700 billion in cuts to Medicare and multitude of new tax increases that are being implemented to pay for Obamacare will only make Suffolk County a more expensive place to live, work, raise a family and retire.

It's clear that we need to change Congress. And we can start by changing our Congressman.

I am running with a specific 10-point plan to create jobs, boost small businesses and grow Long Island's economy.

My plan will help to make Suffolk County more affordable for middle-class families, small businesses, and seniors on a fixed income already struggling to pay sky-high property taxes.

I urge you to read the whole plan or call my campaign headquarters at 631-775-9230 and we will send you a copy.

With your support for me on November 6, we will work together to fix the mess in Washington and move Suffolk County in a new, more positive direction.

RANDY ALTSCHULER

Important Contest

Dear Editor,

Thank you for the cover and story in last week's issue highlighting the September 13 Democratic primary for the New York State Senate. You do a service by letting people know about this contest which gets so little attention because it's only for one race, only within one party, and happening on a September Thursday instead of a November Tuesday.

I'm writing partly to restate this information, so that it gets to as many people as possible:

Tomorrow there will be a primary election for the Democratic nomination for state senator from the 1st District, which is the five East End towns and part of Brookhaven. The candidates are Southampton Town Councilwoman Bridget Fleming of Sag Harbor and attorney Jennifer Maertz of Rocky Point. The winner will face the incumbent, Republican Senator Ken LaValle, in the November general election. Voting is for registered Democrats from 6 AM to 9 PM at all the regular polling places.

I'm also writing to say why I support Bridget Fleming in this election. The primary is to pick the better candidate to oppose Ken LaValle, a 36-year incumbent with lots of resources. Bridget Fleming is the better candidate because she has by far the stronger record as a mediator, fraud prosecutor, and twice-elected Southampton Town Councilwoman who, as the only Democrat on the Board, achieved substantial accomplishments by working with Republicans, Independents and Conservatives. Ms. Fleming has obtained almost 40 percent more Democratic petition signatures than Ms. Maertz, and has raised almost seven times as much money.

Like it or not, money counts in elections, until the bright day when we change that.

Bridget Fleming is endorsed by the Working Families Party and will thus be on the November ballot in any event, plus being endorsed by a long list of unions and civic organizations. She is, and comes across as, highly experienced, informed and motivated to fight for Long Island families. As a longtime prosecutor, Bridget Fleming has the street smarts to deal with the predators in Albany. Unlike her opponent, Bridget Fleming has scored real achievements for the community, among them helping to restore Southampton's surplus and credit, youth training in construction and retailing, health insurance benefits for fire and EMT volunteers, keeping local jobs by a utility poles law, and working to draw green industry with sustainability measures.

If you're a registered Democrat, please get out and vote on September 13.

GEORGE LYNCH

Dems Da Facts

Dear Rick,

In your 8/29 issue there was another letter from Reg Cornelia referring to an earlier letter which in turn was citing yet another. It reminded me as a child, watching the Perils of Pauline chapters at our local movie house. At this point I was curious to see what subject could possibly require so many rebuttals.

Initially there was a response to a letter from a John Molnar in which he decried the obscene amount of money plus its inequity, spent to secure the Walker Wisconsin election, $30.5 million to his opponent's $3.1 million. He pointed out that that much of the influx of outside money was made possible by the outrageous Supreme Court's "Citizens United" decision and how that decision would effect future elections. He feared that it would literally put them up for sale and that the Wisconsin debacle was proof of that.

Mr. Cornelia rebutted the letter supplying his own figures and personal facts to discredit the letter. He also championed the "Citizens United" Supreme Court decision that corporations and unions were "People" and as such had freedom of speech including the freedom to contribute as much to their chosen Party's candidate as they chose.  

In the following letter, a Mr. Delagado commented critically on Mr. Cornelia's letter, pointing out that it was filled with inaccuracies, misquotes, and outright distortions in his effort to disprove the Molnar letter and solidify his own. Mr. Delgado then proceeded to correct Mr. Cornelia's contentions one by one, replacing them with reality.

Finally this latest 8/29 letter in the continuing saga, Mr. Cornelia doubled down on his original statements massaging them to somehow make them seem less outlandish. Mr. Cornelia is the first person I have read in the Indy letters that actually believes that corporations as well as unions are "People" as per our 5/4 "non-biased" Supreme Court. This decision would be an abomination even if the corporations could not buy and sell the unions an infinite number of times over as they can and indeed had in Wisconsin. 

When a corporation "Person" is executed in Texas I may reconsider but I'd also like to see one enter a voting booth; such idiocy.  I'm certain Mr. Cornelia will rebut this letter as well but I'm all rebutted out and say, good night to Pauline.

Mr. Cornelia, as Daniel Patrick Moynihan said, "Everyone is entitled to their opinion but not to their own facts."

CARL FELDMAN 

Scav Issues

Dear Rick,

Last Thursday's meeting provided the community with the first opportunity to present their views on the Scavenger Waste Plant. This station provides an essential municipal service to all taxpayers, and before jumping into action there are several important considerations and questions that should be taken into account.

Firstly, there should be a long-range plan researched by the town board. Until last Thursday's meeting the supervisor and deputy supervisor have done nothing about this issue except kick it down the road like a tin can. Their idea is to privatize the plant. The Planning Department and the Natural Resource Departments are the ideal governmental groups to work on this issue.

Should the station be (temporarily) closed while these departments and the board work on the issues? Should the station facility be modernized? There needs to be more data and cost benefit analysis. There is more need for pertinent research to inform the public before this community source is gone for good. Kudos to Sylvia Overby for awakening us all to the importance of this problem!

NAOMI SALZ

Long Term Solution

To The Editor,

The Town Board is jeopardizing our safety by contemplating closing the scavenger waste plant. No temporary or permanent closing makes sense. The plant receives pump-outs from cesspools and septic tanks. A closing would cause extreme hardship and unnecessary added expenses to many town residents.

Local small truck carters who serve residential houses testified at a public town board hearing last week that they would be put out of business if the transfer station were closed. Small truck operators serve local residents whose septic systems or cesspools back up.

They would have no way of fixing their problem. Fecal material would back up into their kitchen sinks!

The board should undertake studies to evolve a long-term solution to this problem.

The shortsighted privatization approach is no way to go. Our government must be in charge and control of this vital service to assure the safety and welfare of our residents and the preservation of our land.

DAVID J. WEINSTEIN

Incredible Indy

Dear Jess & Jim,

Thank you SO much for the great press in this week' s, Sept 5th issue, Independent - pages B-5 and B-6. I cannot thank you enough for all of the incredible promotion you have given the [Southampton Animal] shelter this summer, as well as, throughout the year The Independent is a true COMMUNITY paper!

LINDA SHAPIRO

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